Taking water from rivers

Video from NIWA

Principal Scientist Murray Hicks discusses new modelling technology to assist with making decisions on taking water from natural waterways.

To learn more about NIWA: niwa.co.nz

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Kingston Family Vineyards, Casablanca, Chile

Five generations of family here in Casablanca Valley..

To learn more about Kingston Vineyards please visit: kingstonvineyards.com

Follow Kingston Vineyards on twitter: @KingstonWine


 Video from Farm+Cellar

Comprised of pioneers and thought leaders in marketing wine, travel and food, Farm+Cellar has produced over 250 videos, from feature length documentaries to short format and network series length. About Harvest is pleased and honored to collaborate with Farm+Cellar to share the many stories that comprise food and agriculture.

Visit Farm+Cellar: farmandcellar.com
Follow Farm+Cellar on twitter: @FarmandCellar


 

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2014 Latinos in Agriculture Leaders Conference

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Together: Aligning Tomorrow’s Markets and Workforce


Interview with Dr. Edward Romero, Co Founder of 

The Latinos in Agriculture Leaders Conference  



The 2014 Latinos in Agriculture leaders Conference 
takes place in Dallas, Texas on October 17-19. 
This will be the 4th Annual Conference. 
What follows is a "looking back, moving forward" 
republished text version of our podcast interview about 
the first Conference in 2011: The Latinos in Agriculture Leaders Forum

 


 

  Agvocating future leaders

 

 

“We have to plant the seeds to be able to harvest them later”

 


AH: Through this forum and organization AgForLife is seeking agricultural stakeholders with a purpose to improve Latino Representation in agriculture. Please explain why this is so important.

ER:Well I think that Latinos in Agriculture is seeking to connect agricultural stakeholders with the purpose of improving Latino and Hispanic representation in agriculture. There’s several bullets that I think need to be mentioned. But the first is the talent gap in agriculture that continues to widen as the general population ages. This represents the need for talent now and in the future, and can affect agricultural sustainability.

Another thing is, Latinos represent potential talent that can be tapped into our future leaders, employees, employers, consumers in Agvocates that currently aren’t being tapped today.

AH: So why is it vital to inform industry, government, and academia of this existent, and future student, employee and consumer Latino and Hispanic pipeline?

ER:Well if agriculture is going to be sustainable long term, we have to invest in developing our future leaders. Our employers, employees, consumers; the ones that I mentioned a while ago. We also have to plant the seeds so that we can harvest them later in the future. And with jobs in the future requiring more technical and specialized skills, there’s a definite need in our future, in the Ag industry.

And I think we have to continue to educate the general public on the impact agriculture has in our lives, and on the job opportunities available. And I think we also need to do away with the misconception, and the myths about what agriculture is, and can be in the future because so many people don’t understand what agriculture is, and how broad it is.

AH: It’s so true, and there’s so many changes that are happening that it’s important that we all kind of keep up this education, don’t you think?

ER:I think so. I think it’s vitally important. I mean, after all, there’s a lot of people that don’t understand what agriculture does for our society, and for our economy. And so I think that’s important for them to understand that.

AH:Will you tell us about the post conference network that you’re going to develop?

ER:Well really our intent is to develop a concerted effort from industry, government, and education in addressing the opportunities for Latinos that represent agriculture. We also hope to work together in educating Latinos about opportunities in agriculture and really spread the word about these opportunities.

We in essence envision Latinos in agriculture as the catalyst that will begin to start the dialogue among these participants that I just mentioned in industry, government, and education so that we can address these opportunities now, and into the future.

AH:And one of the goals of the workshop is to facilitate a conversation in which the participants will have the opportunity to find out more not only about Latinos but also to find out what, as you put it, let them ask what they always wanted to know but were afraid to ask. Will you tell us more about this?

ER:Well Orlando Gill, who is the President of TCTS Global, and I, we started talking, and TCTC Global, and AgForLife are partnered together to bring this conference to the people. We basically wanted to make sure that we provided a safe place where questions, misconceptions about Latinos were addressed. And so we wanted to make sure that people felt comfortable. To be able to ask things that maybe they hadn’t asked before, and were afraid to ask.

AH:This organization and forum is meant to establish both a dialogue and a movement to address the Latino population as it relates to the impacts to the future of agriculture. Specifically, what outcomes would you like to see resulting through these activities say a year and maybe five years from now?

ER:Well that’s an interesting question because we hope that participants agree that there’s a need to continue this dialogue into the near future, and beyond. This is the first conference that we’re aware of that’s specifically addressing Latinos and agriculture together.

There’s a lot of associations, and organizations already addressing Hispanic issues or Latino issues, and other disciplines, in other areas in other industries. But this is the first where we bring industry, education, and higher Ed together to talk about specifically Latinos in the agricultural arena. And so that we hope that it’s something that they continue the dialogue. And it’s a huge undertaking to address the opportunities. And we know it will take a consistent effort to do this. And so we have to plant the seeds to be able to harvest them later. So we got to start somewhere.

To learn more visit: latinosinagriculture.com
Follow on Twitter: @LatinosInAg
Follow on Twitter: @AgForLife

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Orta Reloaded: The Rebirth of a Lake

Film by Martin Atkin:

25 years ago Lake Orta in northern Italy was the most acidified deep water lake in the world. Today the water quality is good, fish and other aquatic creatures are returning, the water industry is an important international market player, and the lake itself attracts tens of thousands of tourists each year.

Until the 1920s, people and lake lived in harmony. There was a thriving fishing community. But an environmental disaster started when the Bemberg rayon factory opened. For more than half a century, thousands of tonnes of heavy metals and ammonium sulphate were pumped directly into the lake each year. The damage was compounded by discharges from other industries. Within a generation, the lake was all but dead.

The rebirth of Lake Orta dates from the 1970s when tougher regulations and improved technology greatly reduced industrial pollution. In 1989-90, scientists carried out a controversial and ground-breaking experiment, by pumping 15,000 tonnes of crushed limestone into the water to restore the natural pH balance.

Today the lake is clean enough to drink and swim in. There are plenty of fish, and other flora and fauna are well on the way to recovery.

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VISH

“I don’t do traditional Indian Food or traditional southern food”

Film courtesy of the Southern Foodways Alliance at the University of Mississippi.

For more SFA films, visit www.southernfoodways.org.

Follow them on Twitter: @potlikker

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Ashaninka Cocoa from the Peruvian Amazon

Video by: Angela Robson, award-winning writer, broadcaster and film-maker

From the filmmaker:

Deep in the heart of the Selva Central region of the Peruvian Amazon, indigenous communities are working with the Rainforest Foundation UK and Bettys and Taylors of Harrogate to produce their own high-quality Ashaninka-branded organic and fairtrade chocolate – ultimately for national and international distribution.

To learn more or to contact Angela Robson visit: angelarobson.net

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Farming Blueprint: Supporting Students Farmers & Community

Teresa Morris shares the good news about Farming Blueprint  

MAP 2

 Teresa Morris has had an extensive career in the natural resources and earth science fields of study. She is currently pursuing her Ph D in Higher Education for Curriculum Development in Sustainable Agriculture and will be teaching Soil Science at Washington University in 2015.  

 

AH: Please tell us about the Farming Blueprint web­based tool

TM:Unlike other land mapping programs, calculation graphs show expected sustainability results tied to economic outcomes based on the plotted farm design. Farmbp.com helps users understand the connection between sustainable agriculture, earth sciences, and sustainable living. Using maps, drawing tools, graphs, and calculations, the user can see the relationship between sustainable farming methods and the economic value of those methods. The web­based tool takes into account both direct and indirect soil building practices. This tool is a sustainable step towards sustainable living.

When the user draws on the map to design an agricultural or environmental system, basic calculations will generate regarding projected costs, yields, and income. Other calculations involve percent organic matter to the economic value of soil nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus, potash, carbon, and sulfur. The user can begin to understand the sustainable soil EconomicsTM of farming methods such as cover crops, field borders, inter­cropping, pollinator cropping, etc. by seeing the soil economics of those methods. Along with calculations, there will be a sustainability graph showing increase or decrease of soil organic matter, water holding capacity, and carbon sequestration. Finally, as the user designs the system, a Sustainability Chart will display the percentage of sustainability the agricultural system is achieving.

Farming Blueprint will include a feature to include the community. The Blueprint Calendar will display which farmers have produce or meats available for purchase during any given week. Those who want to support the local farmer can visit the Blueprint Calendar to locate what restaurants are buying locally, and frequent those restaurants or they can buy directly from the farmer. Farming Blueprints’ web­based tool supports the student, the farmer, and the community.

AH: You have said that soil is “not always portrayed with connections between the causes and sustainable solutions” will you please explain this?

TM:What I mean by this statement is we tend to want to address soil situations with a quick fix. If it’s an erosion problem, we build a pond or a concert structure. If it’s a nutrient problem, we put synthetic fertilizers on the surface. Just like modern medicine, we tend to look at soil issues as isolated “problems” instead of looking at the soil environment as a whole.

We need to address these and other soil issues with a long term solution in mind. Soil erosion can be addresses with diversified plantings with a diversified root system that not only stabilized the soil but enhance the nutrient cycling and physical properties of soil so as to provide the nutrients that are in the soil with the properties to become available to the plant. So by addressing erosion in a sustainable manner, we also address additional soil issues such as nutrient deficiencies.

AH: What are some of the more pressing challenges that you are contending with around this project?

TM:It’s been said to me that this project is ambitious. I take that as a compliment but what I’ve found is that although people like the idea and finds it interesting, they are hesitant to believe in the realistic idea of its development. Currently, we are in discussion with potential partners to bring this idea past the design phase and into the development stage.

Our web­based tool is the future of education in sustainable soil economicsTM in that we look at soils and how to conserve them from a health and economics perspective. Putting an economic value on the indirect revenue building practices such as field borders or cover crops, as well as direct revenue farming practices (produce & meats), encourages the farmer to design a system for farming that focusing on conserving the soil. Focusing on soil health allows for a system to function economically as well as sustainably.

 

Logo_7.22.2013

 

AH:Congratulations on launching your website! Who do you anticipate to be your users?

TM:Everyone! Our website is our way of introducing the concepts we believe in regarding soil health. We invite users who are interested in the education aspect of soil health as it relates to plant, animal, and our health ­ and can visualize our web­based tool as a platform of learning for in the class room as well as online classes.

We’re also looking forward to working with farmers who want to make a change in their systems but may need that first step in doing so and we want to help the beginning farmers who want to approach their land management from a sustainable soil economicsTM perspective. A system that is from the soil up is economically sustainable.

Finally, we encourage the community members who want to learn which farmers are producing agriculture products in a sustainable manner and from our Blueprint Calendar, can purchase the products so in that way our communities support our farmers.

AH:How will Farming Blueprint help and how is it different than other land mapping programs?

TM:We’ve looked at several mapping programs. Many if not all of them focus on the production aspect alone as in the cash crop or the meat production. They focus on direct dollars with direct production. They also focus on synthetic nutrient implementation. The pest management is a program of scheduled spraying of products.

Our approach is to teach the user how to view their land as a system of economics by addressing the sustainable practices (pollinator cropping, intercropping, pest management planting, erosion control plantings, etc. ) first in order to put in place the soil building practices and then design the direct revenue building practices.

By approaching land management and farming in this way, our perspective shifts from a controlling of the environment, which is costly, to seeing the economic potential of the land from sustainable management. By learning the concepts in this way, of food production, the user can research in detail all aspects that interest them and learn how to sustain their land and their money.

MAP 1

 

AH:Farming Blueprint was accepted into the AASHE conference in Portland Oregon, tell us about that please.

TM:We are thrilled to be accepted into the AASHE conference! AASHE stands for the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. We will present our web­based tool as an element for education in sustainable agriculture and conservation of soils. We want to promote our philosophy of Sustainable Soil EconomicsTM. Teresa Morris has been working on a curriculum design that she wants to provide to universities with the web­based tool as a package for learning.

Her focus of education is from the conceptual learning model which means the user learns from a 3­ dimensional perspective. Traditionally, much of education is from a fact and skill base. However, Farming Blueprint’s web­based tool allows the user to add in a third dimension of the concepts associated with the facts and skills. We want to promote our web­based tool at the AASHE conference as a conceptual component of learning sustainability. Learning from a conceptual model, encourages the student to seek a deeper meaning in regards to the self, relationship to community, and other cultures. Many times when people want to make a change in their lives, they get caught in finding the first step – Farming Blueprint wants to be the “step” towards true sustainability as it relates to agriculture, community, and culture.

To learn more visit: www.farmbp.com
Follow on Twitter: Farmbp.com

To be continued…..

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

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Wine: A Very Old Concept

“..made for thousands of years with two ingredients, grapes & time”

Video created by: theperennialplate.com
In Partnership with: intrepidtravel.com/food

Wine has been made for thousands of years with two ingredients, grapes and time. At Cecchin winery in Mendoza, Argentina they continue to make this drink in the same manor.

For more information on Bodega Cecchin visit: bodegacecchin.com.ar

Filmed & edited by:

Daniel Klein: twitter.com/perennialplate
Mirra Fine: twitter.com/kaleandcola

Music by:

Lullatone: lullatone.com
Quinteto Finisterre Tango: quintetofinisterretango.bandcamp.com/releases

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

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Waternet

Video from The International Water Association

From IWA:

Serving the Amsterdam area, Waternet is the first water cycle company in the Netherlands. From drinking water to resource recovery and the production of energy, Waternet is the embodiment of the transition to a cycle approach in the use of water.

An example of resource recovery is the production of Truvide – an agriculture fertiliser.

IWA is an organisation that brings together people from across the water profession to deliver equitable and sustainable water solutions for our world.

Follow them on twitter: @IWAHQ
To learn more visit: iwahq.org

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Double Chocolate Zucchini Bread Recipe

Wondering what to do with all those zucchini’s from your garden?

Video from Le Gourmet TV, to learn more visit at: legourmet.tv
Follow Le Gourmet TV on twitter: @LeGourmetTV

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