A Farmer and His IPhone

“Hay making on a Welsh Hill Farm”

Video from Guto Jones

Who better to show and share the process of farming than a farmer?

Follow Guto Jones on Facebook @ facebook.com/guto.jones.14

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

A Pasta Story

Video from theperennialplate.com

From the filmmakers:

In the Hills of Tuscany at Azienda SanCristoforo, the Pedrini family welcomed us in to their home for two days and shared their passion for heirloom grains, biodynamic farming and make pasta.

Created by: theperennialplate.com
In Partnership with: intrepidtravel.com/food

Filmed & edited by:

Daniel Klein ( twitter.com/perennialplate/ )
Mirra Fine ( twitter.com/kaleandcola/)
Music by The Hummingbirds: facebook.com/hummingbirdsmusic
and The Poor Nobodys: thepoornobodys.com

Filmed on 5d Mark iii w Canon 24-70, 70-200 2.8 L

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

Improving farmworker living conditions

Video from California Health Report TV:

In this story we go to the rural farming communities about 60 miles east of wealthy Palm Springs, where tens of thousands of people live in what many have described as third world conditions.

They crowd into dilapidated mobile home parks where clean drinking water is hard to come by and other public services can be sporadic. We’ll get a glimpse of the efforts of Rodolfo Pinon with Pueblo Unido – a nonprofit that’s working to improve the quality of life for farmworkers’ and their families.

To learn more visit healthycal.org

Follow on twitter: @healthreportCA

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

Blueberry Lemon Handpies Recipe

Recipe & baking by Josh Hager

Video by Daniel Pryde

Click here for the full recipe and instruction.

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

Cawthron Institute: Creating a better breed of mussel

From Cawthron Institute:

Cawthron Aquaculture Park has a comprehensive research programme and works in collaboration with Greenshell™ mussel commercial entities. The latest phase in a long involvement with this species is aimed at identifying and breeding from more stress-tolerant and efficient mussel families, along with selection for more desirable traits in colour, taste, texture and size.

Cawthron Institute is New Zealand’s largest independent research institute specialising in freshwater and coastal marine species, environmental research and research for food and aquaculture industries. It also has substantial testing laboratories and provides seafood safety testing for key sectors of the aquaculture industry.

Video and news story courtesy of Rural Delivery and Showdown Productions.

To learn more about the Cawthron Institute visit: cawthron.org.nz

Follow them on twitter: @Cawthron_NZ

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

Indepth: The Gullah Project

About Harvest interview with The Gullah Project Director, Denise McGill:

 

AH: The Gullah and Geechee people live on the Sea Islands located along the southeastern coastline of the United States, please tell us about their characteristic language and culture.

James Bradley Jr. is the captain of the shrimp boat Bradley’s Pride, just like his father before him

James Bradley Jr. is the captain of the shrimp boat Bradley’s Pride, just like his father before him

DM:Gullah and Geechee are two terms for the same people group that once inhabited most of the outer islands from North Carolina to Florida. They are the descendants of enslaved African-Americans. Because of the heat and lethal mosquitos that once typified the Sea Coast Islands, white landowners spent as little time as possible on their plantations. Left mostly alone, the slaves’ food, handmade baskets and much of their culture stayed similar to its West African roots. They developed a distinct dialect. Many Gullah today can trace their lineage to a specific village on the other side of the Atlantic.

AH:The Gullah culture is based on farming and fishing. How is it being endangered?

DM:After slavery, many families survived by raising produce on small farms. Fishermen traded with farmers for what they needed, but there was extreme poverty and isolation. The last fifty years have brought dramatic changes. The rise of global agribusiness squeezed small-time farmers and fishermen out of the market, depriving them of even a meager living.

Meanwhile, improvements in the country’s education and infrastructure enticed many islanders to go away in search of better opportunities. During that same time, land values on the islands increased as the rest of the country demanded vacation homes and golf courses. A few acres of oceanfront property was worth far more than a family could ever earn farming. As a result, very few Gullah communities remain intact. St. Helena Island is special because it’s one of the last farming communities left on the east coast. Those who are successful tend to combine their traditional knowledge with modern practices in conservation and entrepreneurship.

A palmetto tree on St. Helena Island has survived countless storms.

A palmetto tree on St. Helena Island has survived countless storms.

AH: What more can you tell us about the Gullah people?

DM:Traditionally the Gullah are very self-sufficient. St. Helena Island has retained much of its identity because of the Penn School, established as a freedman’s school during the Civil War. During the Jim Crow era, it was a boarding school where African-American children could learn a trade.

Now called the Penn Center, it is still a place that provides community education and resources. One of their main missions currently is helping Gullah families keep their land.

Sara’ Reynolds Green, owner of Marshview Community Organic Farm, discusses her sweet potato varieties with film director Denise McGill.

Sara’ Reynolds Green, owner of Marshview Community Organic Farm, discusses her sweet potato varieties with film director Denise McGill.

AH:Federal resources have been dedicated to help the Gullah people, please tell us about this.

DM:The Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor, established by Congress in 2006, provides resources to recognize and preserve Gullah culture.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is working harder to make its programs available to minority farmers and business owners nationwide. Since Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack took the reigns in 2009, he has taken significant steps to address discrimination at the agency. He also established the StrikeForce Initiative in 2010 to combat chronic poverty in rural areas.

gullah-project-logo
AH:What comes next and how can people get involved?

DM:The Gullah Project is a documentary and multimedia project about families who still farm and fish for a living on St. Helena Island, S.C. I’m grateful to the families there who have let me into their lives. Currently the documentary film The Gullah Project is in post-production and is set to premiere in January 2015.

Meanwhile we are releasing segments on our website: thegullahproject.org. Please follow us and spread the word There are lots of ways like-minded individuals can join our team. We are specifically looking for funding and distribution sources.

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

Oldest Pinot Noir Vine in the Willamette Valley

From Cooking Up a Story:

Dundee, Oregon. David Lett may not have single-handedly put Oregon wine on the world map, but he was certainly one of its earliest, most prescient, winemaking crusaders that helped establish the Oregon wine industry.

In keeping with the tradition that his father and his mother, Diana set, Jason Lett who took over Eyrie Vineyards in 2005, has begun growing an additional grape varietal—Trousseau— that comes from the foothills of the French Alps. While he continues blazing trails with his own winemaking style, and keen focus on his vineyards, he has never forgotten his family roots—where it all began.

To learn more about Cooking Up a Story visit: cookingupastory.com

Follow them on twitter: @cookingupastory

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

Saving the Chesapeake Bay, One Delicious Oyster at a Time

Film by Kristen Taylor Sorensen

From the filmmaker:

The Chesapeake Bay was once home to billions and billions of oysters. Now the oyster population is less than 1% of historic numbers. Tim Devine, owner of Barren Island Oysters, is a self-taught oyster farmer. He provides local restaurants with savory oysters while simultaneously promoting efforts to save the bay and restore the oyster population.

Devine’s process is his own*. He builds most of his owns oyster farming tools. His boat lived in an old lady’s front yard and had weeds growing in it before he bought it and restored it. His refurbished shop is so close to shore it floods at least twice a year. And he raises the most delicious, the most beautiful, and the most expensive oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. He does this all while helping to filter bay water and build oyster reefs for marine life to build a habitat in and around.

There are dozens of restorations projects dedicated to restoring the bay to a healthy habitat including some big names like the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the University of Maryland’s Center for Environmental Science. “It took a couple hundred years to destroy this resource. It’s going to take a long time, a lot of money and a lot of effort to bring it back,” says Don “Mutt” Meritt, program director of the University of Maryland’s Oyster Hatchery in Horn Point.

Though Devine is relatively new to the oyster business – he opened up shop just last year – he dedicates 7 days a week to the cause by raising tasty oysters and awareness about how they can help save the bay.

*Devine starts his process by obtaining spat, or baby oysters. He purchases 250,000 at a time while they are not much bigger than a grain of sand. He places them in mesh bottom buckets and nurtures them by pumping algae rich water into and around the buckets in an “upwelling” system he built himself. Over the months, the spat grow bigger and Devine graduates them to bigger and bigger upwellers until they are ready for the large cages he keeps hundreds of yards away from the shore. He is constantly pulling them out of the water, chipping off the edges to make them stronger and transferring them to larger cages. By the time an oyster is boxed up and headed to a local restaurant, it has passed through Devine’s hands dozens of times.

To view more visit: kristentaylorsorensen.com

Follow Kristen Taylor Sorenson on Twitter: @KristenTaylorS

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

The Farmer’s Haiku Almanac

Video from Blik:

The Farmer’s Haiku Almanac is presented in traditional Japanese phrasing of a 5-7-5 syllable line form. The essence of haiku is “cutting” (kiru). This is often represented by the juxtaposition of two images or ideas and a kireji (“cutting word”) between them, a kind of verbal punctuation mark which signals the moment of separation and colors the manner in which the juxtaposed elements are related.

We hope you enjoy our haiku film and are inspired to get your hands in the dirt.

To learn more about Blik design studio visit: tylerblik.com

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.

The Indie Farmer Road Trip

Video produced by: indiefarmer.com

From the filmmakers:

The Indie Farmer Road Trip is a crowd funding campaign on indiegogo to raise money to help cover some basic costs of going on a 6 week scooter road trip to discover and showcase some of the UK’s best independent farmers and artisans via my website indiefarmer.com and a special edition print journal.

Donations to the campaign will be met with perks, which include a beautiful coffee table print journal, a funky indie farmer t-shirt and a choice of hampers boxes featuring products from independent food and drink producers.

Please Watch, Pledge and Share:

To learn more visit: indiefarmer.com

To contribute visit: indiegogo.com/projects/the-indie-farmer-road-trip

About Harvest, LLC shares stories about food and agriculture. Subscribe to receive stories about the science, history and relevance of agricultural crops grown and harvested around the world.